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News & Events

Kellogg Associate Professor of Finance Joshua Rauh was named to the <i>Crain's Chicago Business</i> '40 Under 40' list.

Kellogg Associate Professor of Finance Joshua Rauh was named to the Crain's Chicago Business '40 Under 40' list.

'Forward thinkers and straight talkers'

<i>Crain's Chicago Business</i> includes Associate Professor Joshua Rauh and entrepreneur Jessica Kim '05 on this year’s list of '40 Under 40'

By Rebecca Lindell

12/7/2011 - When you’ve made a significant impact early in your career, people tend to notice. 
 
Each year, Crain’s Chicago Business assembles its list of “40 Under 40” — “the dealmakers and dreamers, forward thinkers and straight talkers” who are shaping their fields and industries.

The 2011 list includes Kellogg Associate Professor of Finance Joshua Rauh, 37, and 2005 Kellogg graduate Jessica Kim, 33, founder of baby-product company BabbaCo Inc.

Rauh, whose work on pensions has been cited by Congress, was hailed as a national authority in the debate over the cost of government pensions.

Jessica Kim
Jessica Kim '05, founder of baby-product company BabbaCo Inc., was also included on the '40 Under 40' list. 
Photo courtesy of Jessica Kim ’05
Kim, meanwhile, was noted for her work as an entrepreneur. The winner of the COMPETE contest at Chicago’s TechWeek Conference in July, Kim is the creator of BabbaCo and the BabbaBox, a monthly subscription service delivering educational and craft materials to parents of toddlers.

The Dec. 5 issue of Crain’s takes a closer look at Rauh, Kim and their peers, as well as the ways these impact-makers unwind when they aren’t actively making a difference.