Kellogg News

Senior associate dean to lead business school as search for permanent dean continues

Summit brings together more than 800 alumnae, faculty and students for robust discussion on challenges women face.

Dean Sally Blount ’92 honored Roslyn M. Brock ’99, Ann M. Drake ’84 and Richard H. Lenny ’77

Experiential courses and individualized co-curricular programming provide the launch pad students need to tackle big issues

Kellogg supports marketers at every stage of their career

News & Events

If consumers are unhappy with bank fees, Professor Mitchell Petersen says they owe it to themselves to shop around. “Look at your options. We’re blessed in this country with a huge number of banks,” he says.

If consumers are unhappy with bank fees, Professor Mitchell Petersen says they owe it to themselves to shop around. “Look at your options. We’re blessed in this country with a huge number of banks,” he says.

Take it to the bank

Professor Mitchell Petersen discusses bank fees and what consumers can do if they are unhappy with their banking situation

By Brendan Cosgrove

Listen to Mitchell Petersen's commentary on banking fees:

Audio Player



Download audio file (.mp3)

Bank of America has faced a backlash over its plan to charge customers a monthly fee to use debit cards.

Last month’s decision by the Charlotte-based bank is the latest in an effort by several financial institutions to recoup revenues they say have been lost by increased government regulation.

Mitchell Petersen, the Glen Vasel Professor of Finance at the Kellogg School of Management, says that might not be entirely true.

“Five years ago, they also could have raised fees,” Petersen says. “If they’re raising them now to replace lost profits, they’re implicitly saying they didn’t raise them five years ago because they were making enough money.”

Petersen says there are very few businesses that won’t take advantage of an opportunity to make a profit. He says banks are raising fees now because they believe there is a general industry trend to do so, leaving consumers with fewer feeless options.

In this audio Q&A, Petersen discusses bank fees and what consumers can do if they are unhappy with their banking situation.