Sally Blount
Sally Blount

MANAGEMENT & ORGANIZATIONS
Dean, Kellogg School of Management
Michael L. Nemmers Professor of Management & Organizations

Print Overview

Sally Blount became dean of the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University on July 15, 2010.

Dean Blount, an internationally recognized expert in the fields of negotiation and behavioral decision-making, has more than 20 years of experience in higher education. In addition, she has significant experience incorporating international and social impact perspectives into business education.

Dean Blount received her Ph.D. in management and organizations from Kellogg in 1992 after earning a joint bachelor’s degree from Princeton University’s engineering and Woodrow Wilson schools in 1983.

From 1992 to 2001, Dean Blount was on the faculty of the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, where she was consistently one of the most highly rated MBA and executive education professors. Earlier in her career, she worked as a consultant with the Boston Consulting Group.

In 2001, Dean Blount joined New York University’s Stern School of Business, where from 2004 to 2010 she served as the dean of its undergraduate college and vice dean of the school. At NYU, she was the Abraham L. Gitlow Professor of Management and Organizations and also held an affiliated appointment at the Wagner School of Public Service. In 2007, she was appointed by NYU’s president and provost as their special adviser for global academic integration.

During her tenure at NYU, Dean Blount provided strategic direction for the school’s most selective undergraduate college. She set fundraising records at the college, securing its first-ever $15 million gift, and led the college to become a recognized innovator in undergraduate business education. Under her leadership, the average SAT score of the entering freshman class increased by nearly 50 points, and student participation in global semester study abroad increased from 25 percent to 75 percent. She initiated several curricular innovations, including a required four-course social impact core and two global degree options. She also oversaw the Stern School’s complete, donor-funded renovation of its undergraduate campus.

Dean Blount has taught courses in management, negotiations and ethics and is the author of more than 30 journal articles on those topics. She has received many academic awards, including two National Science Foundation grants, and has served on academic advisory boards at Princeton University, the National Science Foundation, the Economic Science Association and the Academy of Management.

She is a director of Abbott Laboratories and a member of the Commercial and Economic Clubs of Chicago and The Chicago Network. She serves on advisory boards for the Aspen Institute’s Business and Society Program, the Chicago Innovation Awards, the Indian School of Business, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Business School, and Fundação Dom Cabral in Brazil.

Print Vita
Education
Ph.D., 1992, Organizational Behavior, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University
M.S., 1991, Organizational Behavior, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University
B.S.E., 1983, Engineering Systems and Economic Policy, School of Engineering and Applied Science and Woodrow Wilson School of International and Public Affairs, Princeton University, High Honors

Academic Positions
Dean, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 2010-present
Michael Ludwig Nemmers Professor of Management & Organizations, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 2010-present
Advisor to the President and Provost for Global Integration, New York University, 2007-2010
Abraham L. Gitlow Professor of Management and Organizations, New York University, 2004-2010
Dean of the Undergraduate College, New York University, 2004-2010
Vice Dean , New York University, 2004-2010
Professor of Management, Stern School of Business, New York University, 2001-2004
Associate Professor of Behavioral Science , Booth School of Business, University of Chicago, 1996-2001
Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science , Booth School of Business, University of Chicago, 1992-1996
Instructor/Research Assistant, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 1988-1992

Other Professional Experience
Director of Finance and Planning, Eva Maddox Associates, Inc., 1985-1988
Associate Consultant, Boston Consulting Group, Inc., 1983-1985

Grants and Awards
Division Chair, Academy of Management – Conflict Management Division, 2004-2005
Program Chair, Academy of Management – Conflict Management Division, 2002-2003
Review Panel member, National Science Foundation – DRMS program, 2002-2004
Principal Investigator, National Science Foundation, 2001-2005
Doctoral Consortium Coordinator, Academy of Management – Conflict Management Division, 2001-2002
Research Scholar, Enron Corporation, 2001
Best Paper Award, Academy of Management Proceedings, 2000
Principal Investigator, National Science Foundation, 1998-1999
Executive Board member, Economic Science Association, 1997-2000
Alumni Advisory Board member, Princeton University School of Engineering, 1996-2002
Research Scholar, James S. Kemper Foundation, 1996-1997
Best Dissertation Award, International Association for Conflict Management, 1993
Austin Scholar, J. L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management, 1988
Sheldon Research Prize, Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Xi, Princeton University, 1982-1983
Visiting Scholar, Institute of Applied Systems Analysis, 1982

 
Print Research
Articles
Sanchez-Burks, Jeffrey, Caroline Bartel and Sally Blount. 2009. Performance in intercultural interactions at work: Cross-cultural differences in response to behavioral mirroring. Journal of Applied Psychology.(94): 216-223.
Blount, Sally and Sophie Leroy. 2007. Individual temporality in work organizations: How individuals perceive and value time at work. Research in the Sociology of Work – Work Place Temporalities .(17): 147-177.
Blount, Sally. 2004. Time in groups: An introduction. Research on Managing Groups and Team .(6): 1-7.
Chen, Ya-Ru, Sally Blount and Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks. 2004. The role of status differentials in group synchronization. Research on Managing Groups and Team .(6): 111-133.
Jost, John, Sally Blount, Jeffrey Pfeffer and György Hunyady. 2003. Fair market ideology: Its cognitive-motivational underpinnings. Research in Organizational Behavior .(25): 53-91.
Blount, Sally and Tanya Menon. 2003. The messenger bias: A relational model of knowledge valuation. Research in Organizational Behavior .(25): 137-186.
Blount, Sally and Gregory Janicik. 2002. Getting and staying in-pace: The in-synch preference and its implications for work groups. Research on Managing Groups and Teams .(4): 235-66.
Blount, Sally and Gregory Janicik. 2001. When plans change: Examining how people evaluate timing changes in work organizations. Academy of Management Review .(26): 566-585.
Blount, Sally and Richard Larrick. 2000. Framing the game: Examining frame choice in bargaining. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes .(81): 43-71.
Janicik, Gregory and Sally Blount. 2000. The ‘delay-of-game’ effect: The self-imposed costs of impatient responses to negotiation slowdowns. Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings .
Blount, Sally. 2000. Whoever said that markets were fair?. Negotiation Journal .(16): 237-252.
Bazerman, Max, Don Moore, Ann Tenbrunsel, Kim Wade-Benzoni and Sally Blount. 1999. Explaining joint versus separate preference reversals. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization.(39): 41-58.
Hsee, Christopher, George F. Loewenstein, Sally Blount and Max Bazerman. 1999. Preference reversals between joint and separate evaluations of options: A review and theoretical analysis. Psychological Bulletin.(125): 576-590.
Larrick, Richard and Sally Blount. 1997. The claiming effect: Why players are more generous in social dilemmas than ultimatum games. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology .(72): 810-825.
Blount, Sally, Melissa C. Thomas-Hunt and Margaret Neale. 1996. The price is right - or is it? A reference point model of dyadic price negotiations. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.(68): 1-12.
Blount, Sally and Max Bazerman. 1996. The inconsistent evaluation of absolute versus comparative payoffs in labor supply and bargaining. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization .(30): 227-240.
Blount, Sally. 1995. When social outcomes aren't fair: The effect of causal attributions on preferences. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.(63): 131-144.
Bazerman, Max, Sally Blount and George F. Loewenstein. 1995. Perceptions of fairness in interpersonal and individual choice situations. Current Directions in Psychological Science .(4): 39-43.
Blount, Sally, Max Bazerman and Margaret Neale. 1995. Alternative models of negotiated outcomes and the nontraditional utility concerns that limit their predictability. Research on Negotiation in Organizations .(5): 95-116.
Blount, Sally and Margaret Neale. 1994. The role of negotiator aspirations and settlement expectancies on bargaining outcomes. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.(57): 303-317.
Blount, Sally. 1994. Testing an economic approach to resource dilemmas. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.(58): 428-456.
Blount, Sally, Kathleen Valley, Max Bazerman, Margaret Neale and Sharon Peck. 1994. Alternative models of price behavior in dyadic negotiations: Market prices, reservation prices, and negotiator aspirations. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes .(57): 430-447.
Bazerman, Max, George F. Loewenstein and Sally Blount. 1992. Reversals of preference in allocation decisions: Judging an alternative versus choosing among alternatives. Administrative Science Quarterly .(37): 220-240.
Valley, Kathleen, Sally Blount, Margaret Neale and Max Bazerman. 1992. Agents as information brokers: The effects of information disclosure on negotiated outcomes. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes .(51): 220-236.
Valley, Kathleen, Sally Blount and Dawn Iacobucci. 1992. The process of assisted negotiations: A network analysis. Group Decision and Negotiation .(2): 117-236.
Mannix, Elizabeth and Sally Blount. 1992. The impact of distributive uncertainty on coalition formation in organizations. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.(51): 198-219.
Blount, Sally and Margaret Neale. 1991. Reservation prices, resistance points, and BATNAs: Determining the parameters of acceptable negotiated outcomes. Negotiation Journal .(7): 379-38.
Mulvey, John and Sally Blount. 1987. Computers in the government: Modeling and policy design. Public Productivity Review .(42): 35-43.
Mulvey, John and Sally Blount. 1985. Using large-scale mathematical programming to construct the U.S. Statistics of Income file. Applications of Management Science.(4): 195-206.
Book Chapters
Blount, Sally, Mary Waller and Sophie Leroy. 2005. "Coping with temporal uncertainty: When rigid, ambitious deadlines don’t make sense." In Organization at the Limit: NASA and the Columbia Disaster, 122-139.
Blount, Sally. 2005. "Temporal perspective." In Blackwell Encyclopedia of Management: Organizational Behavior , 394-395. 2nd.
Larrick, Richard and Sally Blount. 1995. "Social context in tacit bargaining games: Consequences for perceptions of affinity and cooperation." In Negotiation as a Social Process, edited by R.M. Kramer and D.M. Messick, 268-284.
Other
Blount, Sally. "International Study Shouldn’t be Elective." Insider Higher Ed, December 18, 2008.
Blount, Sally. "Grand Illusion: Contrary to Popular Belief, Free Markets Aren’t Really Fair." Stern Business, Fall 2002.
Blount, Sally. "No One Ever Said that Markets were Fair." GSB Chicago magazine, Summer 1998.
Edited Volumes
Blount, Sally, Margaret Neale and Elizabeth Mannix, eds.. 2004. Research on Managing Groups and Teams in Organizations. Volume 6.

 
Print Teaching
Full-Time / Part-Time MBA
Negotiations Fundamentals (MORS-960-C)
The purpose of this course is to study the process of how people reach agreement and to develop an analytical framework for reaching more effective agreements. The course is designed for participants to observe and learn experientially through the use of role-playing exercises. In-class discussions and lectures serve to supplement the exercises.

Executive MBA
Negotiation Strategies (MORSX-470-0)
Negotiation Strategies teaches the art and science of achieving objectives in interdependent relationships, both inside and outside the company. Students practice cross-cultural negotiation, dispute resolution, coalition formation and multiparty negotiations, extremely competitive negotiations, and negotiating via information technology.