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Research Details

Effects of $9 Price Endings on Retail Sales: Evidence from Field Experiments, Quantitative Marketing and Economics

Abstract

Although the use of $9 price endings is widespread amongst U.S. retailers there is little evidence of their effectiveness. In this paper, we present a series of three field-studies in which price endings were experimentally manipulated. The data yield two conclusions. First, use of a $9 price ending increased demand in all three experiments. Second, the increase in demand was stronger for new items than for items that the retailer had sold in previous years. These results suggest that $9-endings maybe more effective when customers have limited information, which may in turn help to explain why retailers do not use $9-ending prices on every item.

Type

Article

Author(s)

Eric T. Anderson, Duncan Simester

Date Published

2003

Citations

Anderson, T. Eric, and Duncan Simester. 2003. Effects of $9 Price Endings on Retail Sales: Evidence from Field Experiments. Quantitative Marketing and Economics. 1(1): 93-110.

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