Kara Palamountain
Kara Palamountain

MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS & DECISION SCIENCES; INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS & MARKETS
Research Assistant Professor
Executive Director of the Global Health Initiative

Print Overview

Kara Palamountain is a Research Assistant Professor at the Kellogg School of Management and the Executive Director of the school's Global Health Initiative (GHI). The GHI is currently working in partnership with NU's Center for Innovation in Global Health Technologies (CIGHT) to develop and produce affordable HIV diagnostics for resource limited settings.

Ms. Palamountain has played a crucial role in identifying the more strategic aspects of introducing diagnostics developed by CIGHT. She has managed over 50 Kellogg field research teams conducting market entry analysis in over a dozen countries (Botswana, Brazil, Cambodia, China, India, Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Vietnam and Zambia).

Ms. Palamountain is a co-investigator on a cost-effectiveness project at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda funded by the McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health. Ms. Palamountain has also served as an external reviewer for various projects under consideration by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and a peer reviewer for Grand Challenges Canada. She also authored "Perspectives On Introduction And Implementation Of New Point-Of-Care Diagnostic Tests" and "Opportunities And Challenges For Cost-Efficient Implementation Of New Point-Of-Care Diagnostics For HIV And Tuberculosis" recently published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases and "Towards the development of point-of-care diagnostics for global health needs" published in Clinical Laboratory International.

Ms. Palamountain is also the President of the Northwestern Global Health Foundation. Prior to her work at the Northwestern Global Health Foundation and at Kellogg, Kara worked as a management consultant in Deloitte's Healthcare practice for over six years (1998-2002; 2004-2006). She received her MBA from Kellogg in 2004 and her BBA from the University of Texas at Austin in 1998.

Print Vita
 
Print Research
Articles
Diermeier, DanielKara Palamountain, Kearsley A. Stewart, David Kelso. 2010. University leadership for innovation in global health and HIV/AIDS diagnostics. Global Public Health. 5(2): 189-196.
Working Papers
Palamountain, Kara, Kearsley A. Stewart, Daniel Diermeier, David Kelso. 2009. Triangulation: A new model for innovation in Global Health and HIV/AIDS Diagnostics.
Cases
Palamountain, Kara, Sachin Waikar, Andrea Hanson and Katherine Nelson. 2008. Balancing Access with Accuracy for Infant HIV Diagnostics in Tanzania (B). Case 5-308-502(B) (KEL384).
Palamountain, Kara, Sachin Waikar, Andrea Hanson and Katherine Nelson. 2008. Balancing Access with Accuracy for Infant HIV Diagnostics in Tanzania (A). Case 5-308-502(A) (KEL383).

 
Print Teaching
Full-Time / Part-Time MBA
Global Initiatives in Management (GIM) (INTL-473-0)

This course counts toward the following majors: International Business

This course offers students an opportunity to learn about non-U.S. business environments within an innovative and flexible framework that combines traditional classroom-based learning with structured in-country field research. From its inception in 1989 as one class of 34 students covering the Soviet Union, the program has grown to become a cornerstone of the Kellogg experience for many students. The school currently sponsors 13 GIM courses composed of approximately 400 students traveling to 15 countries. Evanston full-time students gain admission to GIM classes through the bidding process in the fall quarter. Classroom instruction is held during the winter quarter, followed by two weeks of field research abroad and seminar presentations of written student reports during the spring quarter. (TMP and EMP GIM classes sometimes follow different schedules.) GIM courses are organized by student leaders under the guidance of a faculty adviser. If you would like to become a GIM student leader, please contact the IBMP office for more information.

Medical Technologies in Developing Countries II (KPPI-973-A)
The Medical Technologies in Developing Countries course provides students the unique opportunity to inform the design and launch of medical technologies for developing countries by conducting in-country market research. The students’ findings will be shared with the developers of the medical technologies, including Northwestern University and several companies and philanthropists.

Prior market research trips have taken place in India, Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia, each with a focus on medical technologies such as HIV tests, tuberculosis tests, and mobile health technologies for pediatric health. The full course consists of two sub-courses, KPPI-973-B and KPPI-973-A, as well as two weeks of in-country field work.

Students will spend five weeks in the classroom (KPPI-973-B) learning the science of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and other high-burden diseases; the background on medical technologies under development for these markets; the essentials for conducting medical product market research in these geographies; the basic economics, culture, and politics of the country of interest; and the fundamentals of the country’s healthcare system. Following this initial coursework, students will spend two weeks on the ground understanding how the medical technologies are perceived by the key stakeholders in the market, including: end-users at hospitals and clinics, government officials, and NGOs and distributors. After the field work, students will then return for five weeks in the classroom (KPPI-973-A) where they will learn to analyze their field work, synthesize key findings and provide recommendations to the developers of these medical technologies. Note: Admittance to this course is by application only and students may not drop after the first week of the quarter.

Medical Technologies in Developing Countries I (KPPI-973-B)
The Medical Technologies in Developing Countries course provides students the unique opportunity to inform the design and launch of medical technologies for developing countries by conducting in-country market research. The students’ findings will be shared with the developers of the medical technologies, including Northwestern University and several companies and philanthropists.

Prior market research trips have taken place in India, Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia, each with a focus on medical technologies such as HIV tests, tuberculosis tests, and mobile health technologies for pediatric health. The full course consists of two sub-courses, KPPI-973-B and KPPI-973-A, as well as two weeks of in-country field work.

Students will spend five weeks in the classroom (KPPI-973-B) learning the science of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and other high-burden diseases; the background on medical technologies under development for these markets; the essentials for conducting medical product market research in these geographies; the basic economics, culture, and politics of the country of interest; and the fundamentals of the country’s healthcare system. Following this initial coursework, students will spend two weeks on the ground understanding how the medical technologies are perceived by the key stakeholders in the market, including: end-users at hospitals and clinics, government officials, and NGOs and distributors. After the field work, students will then return for five weeks in the classroom (KPPI-973-A) where they will learn to analyze their field work, synthesize key findings and provide recommendations to the developers of these medical technologies. Note: Admittance to this course is by application only and students may not drop after the first week of the class.