Kellogg in the News

Vox

“They’re not even people”: why Eric Trump’s dehumanizing language matters – 06/06/17
Article explains how Eric Trump’s recent language is plainly dehumanizing, and such language — historically and psychologically — is dangerous. Article quotes Professor Adam Waytz on how it has become clear that “it’s extremely easy to turn down someone’s ability to see someone else in their full humanity.”

Vox

Why Bill Maher’s use of the n-word finally crossed the line – 06/06/17
Article discusses Bill Maher’s long politically incorrect history, citing research from Professor Nour Kteily on how different ethnic groups were ranked based on how evolved participants perceived them to be; among the set of groups provided, Muslims ranked the lowest.

Bloomberg

Latin America's Constitution Problem – 06/05/17
Article explains how the contract between citizens and their government shouldn't be treated like an Etch A Sketch, quoting Adjunct Lecturer Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez on how few Latin American countries have true national constitutions. “"Latin America doesn't have elections, only revolutions…New leaders want to imprint their image on their nations, throw out the ancient regime and recreate things in their own image.”

Fortune

The One Thing That Makes Investors Run the Other Way – 06/05/17
Article by Adjunct Lecturer Mark Achler explains how entrepreneurs can go about building their businesses, reflecting on various lessons he learned after several decades of starting, scaling, and managing businesses.

Poets & Quants For Execs

The Best & Brightest EMBAs: Class of 2017 – 06/05/17
Article highlights the work and accomplishments of some of the best and brightest EMBA graduates of 2017, determined by Poets & Quants. Kellogg EMBA students Oliver Jarrett and Jeffrey Brunton were both recognized in the list.

Forbes

Trump's Oily Trade Deficit – 06/04/17
Article by Adjunct Lecturer Phil Levy delves into the data and details of what happened during the three weeks of the January-April deficit expansion that occurred while under President Donald Trump’s watch.

Fortune

The Number One Reason You Should Quit Your Job – 06/03/17
Article by Adjunct Lecturer Mark Achler discusses five things to consider when thinking about leaving your job, including career advancement, passion, bad manager and values.

Mission 4 Media

Mr. Marketing – 06/02/17
Article discusses how both Professor Phil Kotler and Professor Emeritus Sidney Levy worked together at Kellogg to bring groundbreaking concepts to light. While Kotler published his theories in textbooks, Levy’s 1959 paper was the first to say that marketing sells symbols, not just merchandise. The two professors became fast friends as a result of their shared love for marketing. While Levy retired in 1991 he continues to visit Professor Kotler’s classes from time to time. By questioning each other’s ideas, they were able to cultivate revolutionary ideas that came to life in Kellogg classrooms.

American Marketing Association

The Friendship that Changed Marketing Forever – 06/01/17
Profile of Professor Phil Kotler and Professor Emeritus Sid Levy, who have been friends, colleagues and pioneers in marketing and branding for 55 years.

Chicago Tribune

Passage of Illinois minimum wage bill generates worker optimism, employer anxiety – 06/01/17
Article discusses how the Illinois Senate approved a bill on Wednesday that would gradually raise Illinois’ minimum wage to $15 an hour over the next five years, raising hope among low-wage workers but causing concern for businesses. Professor Scott Baker said that spreading the increase out over five years would help ease the impact of the wage increase.

Chicago Tribune

Student babysitting service wins at business pitch – 06/01/17
Article describes last week’s Business Incubator Pitch night at Lake Forest High School, emceed by Adjunct Lecturer Dean DeBiase. The event was the culmination of a yearlong honors business class for juniors; 16 proposed businesses presented to a board of businesspeople that selected four proposals that might make valuable businesses. A service that allows parents to find babysitters online won $17,500.

Forbes

Speed Limits On Trade Talks – 05/31/17
Article by Adjunct Professor Phil Levy discusses the obstacles that the Trump administration will face in future trade talks.

Fortune

5 Reasons Amazon Should Keep Opening Brick-and-Mortar Stores – 05/31/17
Article by Professor Alexander Chernev discusses five reasons why physical stores may benefit Amazon, in light of the company’s seventh physical store opening in New York City last week. He reasons that brick-and-mortar stores allow opportunities for content discovery, content promotion, device showcases, Amazon Prime promotion, and brand building.

Chicago Tribune

Kyle Schwarber’s slump may also ding his brands – 05/30/17
Article examines how the Cubs outfielder Kyle Schwarber’s slump this season is negatively impacting the brand campaigns of his endorsers. “Brands want to align with compelling players. One of the things that makes someone compelling is when they deliver outstanding results. No question a slump does bad things for marketability,” said Professor Tim Calkins.

Forbes

What Does The U.S. Pay For Trade Deals? – 05/26/17
Article by Adjunct Professor Phil Levy points out four recent examples demonstrating that reciprocity does not automatically imply concessions against other industries. He notes that it is wrong to conclude that the United States must lose because of reciprocity, as the point of reciprocity is that both countries perceive a gain.

Inc.

Data-Driven Marketing: The Moneyball Method – 05/26/17
Article provides an in-depth exploration of data-driven marketing, highlighting why it’s important, why companies are hesitant to employ it, and the best way to approach understanding and implementing it. “Organizations that embrace marketing metrics and create a data-driven marketing culture have a competitive advantage that result sin significantly better financial performance than that of their competitors,” said Adjunct Professor Mark Jeffery.​

Chicago Tribune

Working at Kraft Heinz means competition, cost-cutting, and for some, reward – 05/25/17
Article discusses Kraft Heinz’s company culture of vigorous cost-cutting and high levels of competition; in this type of environment, the “young and hungry” can thrive, those who don’t buy into the culture are left behind, and results are the utmost priority. Professor Nicholas Pearce notes that a merit-based system for pay and promotions that is perceived as transparent can help the bottom line, but does not eradicate the potential for bias and favoritism in determining which employees advance.

CNBC.com

For insurers, CBO sees more flexibility and instability in GOP’s revised health-care bill – 05/25/17
Article discusses the positive and negative implications of the Congressional Budget Office’s report on the House’s revised American Health Care Act for health insurers. “There’s nothing in the CBO that suggests that it’s going to be easier for insurers to be in the non-group market. It becomes very hard to offer any comprehensive insurance in those markets because you’re going to attract all the sick people. You can charge them more, but you better hope that you’re getting it right,” said Professor Craig Garthwaite.

Forbes

Speed Is Not A Strategy: Foresight, Strategy And Speed In A World of Rapid Change – 05/25/17
Article by Professor Robert Wolcott discusses how foresight, rather than speed, is crucial to developing a strong business strategy. He notes that foresight is not about prediction, but rather about defining multiple plausible futures and identifying leading indicators to track how the world is actually trending.

USA Today

CBO says sick folks in some states may never be able to get health insurance – 05/25/17
Article explores the new Congressional Budget Office report on the Affordable Care Act replacement; the report states that about one in six individuals who are sick or have suffered from chronic health conditions will pay more for health insurance that covers less, if they can even get insurance at all. Professor Craig Garthwaite says that conservative states are the most likely to opt out of ACA requirements.