BEGIN:VCALENDAR PRODID:-//Microsoft Corporation//Outlook 16.0 MIMEDIR//EN VERSION:2.0 METHOD:PUBLISH X-MS-OLK-FORCEINSPECTOROPEN:TRUE BEGIN:VTIMEZONE TZID:Central Standard Time BEGIN:STANDARD DTSTART:16011104T020000 RRULE:FREQ=YEARLY;BYDAY=1SU;BYMONTH=11 TZOFFSETFROM:-0500 TZOFFSETTO:-0600 END:STANDARD BEGIN:DAYLIGHT DTSTART:16010311T020000 RRULE:FREQ=YEARLY;BYDAY=2SU;BYMONTH=3 TZOFFSETFROM:-0600 TZOFFSETTO:-0500 END:DAYLIGHT END:VTIMEZONE BEGIN:VEVENT CLASS:PUBLIC CREATED:20230118T223858Z DESCRIPTION:Speaker:\nChris Kuzawa\, John D. MacArthur Professor\, Departme nt of Anthroplogy\, Northwestern University\n\nTitle:\nFetal developmental plasticity as signal-noise problem: the case of nutrients and stress phys iology\n\nAbstract:\nThe stage of human development marked by greatest sen sitivity and developmental plasticity occurs prior to birth\, when the dev eloping embryo and fetus are embedded within the highly regulated intraute rine environment maintained by the mother’s body. In this talk\, I will discuss the timescales of maternal experience that modify this milieu\, wi th a focus on two crucial systems: nutrient metabolism and stress physiolo gy. I will argue that elaborate and redundant maternal buffering of nutri ent delivery uncouples short term variability in what the mother eats – whether negative changes like famine or improvements in the form of nutrit ional supplementation - from fetal nutrition and development\, which inste ad track changes in maternal nutrition on a longer\, generational timescal e. In contrast\, stress physiology is by design highly responsive to the m other’s short-term experiences and the responsiveness of these systems h ave broad spill-over effects on fetal development\, thus linking offspring biological and health outcomes to acute variability in maternal stress du ring pregnancy. I will discuss the relevance of these principles for under standing the evolution of the flow of ecological information across genera tions and the design of interventions aimed at harnessing early life plast icity to improve future population health.\nSpeaker Bio:\n​Chris Kuzawa and hi s students and collaborators use principles from anthropology and evolutio nary biology to gain insights into the biological and health impacts of hu man developmental plasticity. Thier primary field research is conducted in Cebu\, the Philippines\, where they work with a large birth cohort study that enrolled more than 3\,000 pregnant women in 1983 and has since follow ed their offspring into adulthood (now 30 years old). They use the nearly 3 decades of data available for each study participant\, and recruitment o f generation 3 (the grandoffspring of the original mothers)\, to gain a be tter understanding of the long-term and intergenerational impacts of early life environments on adult biology\, life history\, reproduction\, and he alth. A theme of much of this work is the application of principles of dev elopmental plasticity and evolutionary biology to issues of health. Profes sor Kuzawa is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and American Ac ademy of Arts and Sciences.\nLocation:\nIn person: Chambers Hall \, 600 Foster Street\, Lower Level\ nRemote option: https://northwestern.zoom.us/j/91503621521 \nPassc ode: NICO23\nAbout the Speaker Series:\nWednesdays@NICO is a vibrant weekl y seminar series focusing broadly on the topics of complex systems and dat a science. It brings together attendees ranging from graduate students to senior faculty who span all of the schools across Northwestern\, from appl ied math to sociology to biology and every discipline in-between. Please v isit: https://bit.ly/WedatNICO for information on future speakers.\n \n DTEND;TZID="Central Standard Time":20230222T130000 DTSTAMP:20230118T223858Z DTSTART;TZID="Central Standard Time":20230222T120000 LAST-MODIFIED:20230118T223858Z LOCATION:In person at Chambers Hall\, or remote via Zoom PRIORITY:5 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY;LANGUAGE=en-us:Wed@NICO\, 2/22\, Chris Kuzawa TRANSP:OPAQUE UID:040000008200E00074C5B7101A82E00800000000D06B30DC4C2BD901000000000000000 0100000002C28A272DD0A6446AC1C83253A0D5924 X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

Speaker:

Chris Kuzawa\, John D. MacArth ur Professor\, Department of Anthroplogy\, North western University

Title:

Fetal developmental plasticity as signal-noise problem: the case of nutrients and stress physiology

Abs tract:

The stage of human deve lopment marked by greatest sensitivity and developmental plasticity occurs prior to birth\, when the developing embryo and fetus are embedded within the highly regulated intrauterine environment maintained by the mother’ s body. In this talk\, I will discuss the timescales of maternal experienc e that modify this milieu\, with a focus on two crucial systems: nutrient metabolism and stress physiology.  \;I will argue that elaborate and r edundant maternal buffering of nutrient delivery uncouples short term vari ability in what the mother eats – whether negative changes like famine o r improvements in the form of nutritional supplementation - from fetal nut rition and development\, which instead track changes in maternal nutrition on a longer\, generational timescale. In contrast\, stress physiology is by design highly responsive to the mother’s short-term experiences and t he responsiveness of these systems have broad spill-over effects on fetal development\, thus linking offspring biological and health outcomes to acu te variability in maternal stress during pregnancy. I will discuss the rel evance of these principles for understanding the evolution of the flow of ecological information across generations and the design of interventions aimed at harnessing early life plasticity to improve future population hea lth.

Speake r Bio:

Chris Kuzawa and his students and collaborators use p rinciples from anthropology and evolutionary biology to gain insights into the biological and health impacts of human developmental plasticity. Thier primary field research is conducted in Cebu\, the Philippines\, where they work with a large birth cohort study that enr olled more than 3\,000 pregnant women in 1983 and has since followed their offspring into adulthood (now 30 years old). They use the nearly 3 decade s of data available for each study participant\, and recruitment of genera tion 3 (the grandoffspring of the original mothe rs)\, to gain a better understanding of the long-term and intergenerationa l impacts of early life environments on adult biology\, life history\, rep roduction\, and health. A theme of much of this work is the application of principles of developmental plasticity and evolutionary biology to issues of health. Professor Kuzawa is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Location:

In person: Chambers Hall\, 60 0 Foster Street\, Lower Level
Remote option: htt ps://northwestern.zoom.us/j/91503621521
Passcode: NICO23

About the Speaker Series:

Wednesdays@NICO is a vibr ant weekly seminar series focusing broadly on the topics of complex system s and data science. It brings together attendees ranging from graduate stu dents to senior faculty who span all of the schools across Northwestern\, from applied math to sociology to biology and every discipline in-between. Please visit: https://bit.ly/WedatNICO for information on future speakers.

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