Collaboration, Conflict & Negotiation at Kellogg

Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University

 

 

Fall 2017

 

Collaboration, Conflict & Negotiation at Kellogg


Kellogg has long been the global leader in supporting the research and teaching mission of the international conflict management community.

Kellogg Invites Applications for Clinical Faculty Member in the Dispute Resolution and Research Center

Kellogg Seeks New Executive Director to Oversee our Work
in Negotiations and Dispute Resolution


The Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University invites applications and nominations for a new executive director with an open-rank clinical faculty position to oversee day-to-day operations of the Dispute Resolution and Research Center (DRRC). The position involves a combination of teaching negotiations, curriculum development and administration of the center. The executive director will provide leadership to staff, helping to manage teaching materials, the DRRC certificate program and evaluation of award, grant and sponsorship requests.

Primary selection criteria includes a history of teaching negotiations at the MBA level, a commitment to teaching excellence and a PhD in a social science discipline. Please forward this information to any interested parties. The full job description can be found here, and all inquiries can be sent to DRRCrecruiting@kellogg.northwestern.edu.

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New Kellogg Publications on Collaboration, Conflict and Negotiation


Kellogg faculty are deeply committed to research across the discipline. Recent academic publications include the following:

“Users Polarization on Facebook and YouTube” was published in PLoS ONE and authored by Alessandro Bessi, Fabiana Zollo, Michela Del Vicario, Michelangelo Puliga, Antonio Scala, Guido Caldarelli, Brian Uzzi and Walter Quattrociocchi. The research observes that users online tend to select information that supports their beliefs, forming polarized groups who share the same view—e.g. echo chambers. Algorithms for content promotion may favor this phenomenon, by accounting for users preferences and thus limiting the exposure to unsolicited contents. Researchers performed a comparative study on how the same videos are consumed on different online social media—i.e., Facebook and YouTube—over a sample of 12 million users. The findings show that content drives the emergence of echo chambers on both platforms and that users’ commenting patterns are accurate predictors for the formation of echo chambers.
(April, 2016)

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences published “Memories of unethical actions become obfuscated over time,” research by Professor Maryam Kouchaki and F. Gino. The research explores one possibility of why people engage in unethical behavior over time by suggesting that their memory for their past unethical actions is impaired because of the psychological distress and discomfort such misdeeds cause. (May, 2016)

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“Occupational Survival through Task Integration: Systems Men, Production Planners, and the Computer, 1940s-1990s” was published by Organization Science and authored by Steve Kahl, Brayden King and Greg Liegel. The paper examines how occupational groups survive the introduction of a new technology and associated jurisdictional changes. The authors draw on a comparative historical analysis of two occupational associations’—systems men and production planners—efforts to frame their evolving tasks and relate to other occupations after the introduction of the computer into U.S. business in the early 1950s. (October, 2016)

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Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin published “Backlash: The Politics and Real-World Consequences of Minority Group Dehumanization” by Nour Kteily and Emile Bruneau. The research suggests that members of advantaged groups who feel dehumanized by other groups respond aggressively. But little is known about how meta-dehumanization affects disadvantaged minority group members, historically the primary targets of dehumanization. The research examines this important question in the context of the 2016 U.S. Republican Primaries, which have witnessed the widespread derogation and dehumanization of Mexican immigrants and Muslims. (November, 2016)

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New Kaplan Ethics Seminar Series


The Kaplan Ethics Series, sponsored by the Ford Motor Company Center for Global Citizenship, brings together leading thinkers on ethics and morality from a variety of disciplines. These talks will explore the biological, societal, psychological and economic drivers and consequences of ethical behavior and moral thought. The series started with Frans de Waal of Emory University on October 3. Sessions will continue monthly, and future speakers include: Paul Bloom (Yale University), James Andreoni (University of California San Diego), Dan Ariely (Duke University), Leonardo Bursztyn (University of Chicago), Tali Sharot (University College London) and Molly Crockett (Yale University). For more information, contact Shaz Kaiseruddin or call 847.467.0524.

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Eli Finkel Reveals the Structure of Successful Marriages
in ‘The All-or-Nothing Marriage’

 

The All-or-Nothing Marriage

What does a modern marriage look like? And how can today’s couples seek personal fulfillment in their marriages while remaining committed to it for the long run? In “The All-or-Nothing Marriage: How the Best Marriages Work” (Dutton; Sept. 19), Kellogg professor and relationship expert, Eli Finkel, reports on his latest discovery — that although the average marriage today is struggling, the best marriages are flourishing like never before. Further, Finkel reverse-engineers today’s best marriages, distilling strategies that couples can use to strengthen their own marriages. To learn more about the research or to purchase click here.

 

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