Drew Fudenberg

2009 - Drew Fudenberg
"Learning in Games"
Harvard University

Drew Fudenberg is the Frederick E. Abbe Professor of Economics at Harvard University, where he has been teaching since 1993. He received his AB in Applied Mathematics from Harvard College in 1978, and his PhD in economics from MIT in 1981. In addition to being a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Econometric Society, Fudenberg has been a Guggenheim Fellow and a Sloan Research Fellow. He was the editor of Econometrica from 1996 to 2000, helped found Theoretical Economics, and has served on the editorial board of many leading journals, as well as on the council and other committees of the Econometric Society. Fudenberg has written four books, including a leading game-theory text, and more than 80 scientific articles. His seminal work on learning in games highlights the crucial roles of informational feedback and the extensive details of the game. His work on repeated games shows how patient players can achieve cooperative payoffs in a noncooperative equilibrium, even in the presence of moral hazard, adverse selection and imperfect monitoring. He has made major contributions to many other areas of game theory, including reputation effects, evolutionary game theory, incomplete-information bargaining, oligopoly theory, and theoretical industrial organization.