1997 - David M. Kreps
"Anticipated Utility and Dynamic Choice"
Stanford University

David M. Kreps is the Paul E. Holden Professor of Economics at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, where he has been teaching since 1975. His other research and teaching affiliations include the universities of Tel Aviv, Cambridge, Yale, Harvard, Oxford, Paris, and Bocconi, the Hebrew University, and the Catholic University of Louvain. He received his A.B. degree, summa cum laude with the highest distinction in mathematics, from Dartmouth College (1972), and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees (1975) from Stanford University.

Professor Kreps is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a Fellow of the Econometric Society, for which he also served as a member of the Council and of the Executive Council. He was a Sloan Foundation Fellow, a Guggenheim Foundation Fellow and the 1989 recipient of the John Bates Clark Medal. In 1990 he was the Clarendon Lecturer in Economics at Oxford University and Christensen Visiting Fellow at St. Catherine's College, Oxford, and he delivered the Fisher-Schultz Lecture to the Fifth World Congress of the Econometric Society. His many services to the profession include being co-editor of Econometrica, panel member of the Sloan Foundation Fellowship and NSF Program in Economics, and co-chair of the Seventh World Congress of the Econometric Society. For his excellence in teaching, he received the Distinguished Teacher Award from his institution in 1991.

The author of three books and more than 40 papers and articles, Professor Kreps is considered one of the major contributors to the modern areas of decision theory, economics, game theory, finance and management. His papers have been published by the top journals of these fields.