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Support for Asymmetric Violence among Arab Populations: The Clash of Cultures, Social Identity, or Counter- Dominance?, Group Processes & Intergroup Relations

Abstract

Using a random sample of 383 Muslims and Christians in Lebanon and Syria, we explored the degree of public support for two distinct kinds of asymmetric violence-“fundamentalist violence” and “resistance violence”-against the United States as a function of three explanatory narratives: a clash of cultures narrative, social identity/self-categorization theory, and a counter-dominance perspective. Multiple regression analyses showed that the factors most closely associated with support of asymmetric violence among Arab populations was very much dependent upon the type of asymmetric violence. Among both Christians and Muslims, the results showed that perceived incompatibility between Arab and American cultures was the best predictor of support for fundamentalist violence, while perceived American domination of the Arab world was the distinctly strongest predictor of support for resistance violence. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Type

Article

Author(s)

J. Sidanius, Nour Kteily, S. Levin, F. Pratto, Milan Obaidi

Date Published

2015

Citations

Sidanius, J., Nour Kteily, S. Levin, F. Pratto, and Milan Obaidi. 2015. Support for Asymmetric Violence among Arab Populations: The Clash of Cultures, Social Identity, or Counter- Dominance?. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations.

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