U.S. Food Aid: Cash or Commodities?

Abstract

In October 2005 the Bush administration was considering a dramatic change to the U.S. Food Aid program that would take 25 percent of the budget that would otherwise be used to buy food domestically and instead send direct cash transfers that could be used to buy food in or close to the countries in desperate need. The U.S. Food Aid program traditionally enjoyed support in Congress because it provided support to American farmers, agribusiness, and U.S. shipping interests in addition to nongovernmental organizations like Catholic Relief Services and CARE. The case considers the proposal from the perspective of four different stakeholders: Cargill, USAid, Catholic Relief Services, and Oxfam. Each must come up with a response to the proposal.

Type

Case

Author(s)

Timothy Feddersen, Senoe Torgerson

Date Published

07/14/2016

Citations

Feddersen, Timothy, and Senoe Torgerson. U.S. Food Aid: Cash or Commodities?. Case 5-307-510 (KEL342).

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