William Sutter
William P. Sutter, Jr.

FINANCE; ENTREPRENEURSHIP & INNOVATION
Senior Lecturer of Finance

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Professor William P. Sutter, Jr. is a Senior Lecturer of Finance and a member of Kellogg's Larry and Carol Levy Institute for Entrepreneurial Practice. He teaches Venture Capital and Private Equity – The Human Element (ENTR 926), NUvention Medical Innovation (HEMA 915), and Global Governance of Private Companies (ENTR 965). Professor Sutter is a founder of Wildcat Angels and manages the student Associates program for screening deal flow.

Professor Sutter is also a Partner of Hopewell Ventures, a $106 million venture capital fund with an investment focus on high-growth companies located in the Midwest. Hopewell has completed fifteen investments ranging from medical device manufacturers to alternative media companies.

Before becoming a founder of Hopewell, Professor Sutter was a Senior Managing Director of Mesirow Financial's Private Equity division. During his 17-year tenure, capital under management grew to $300 million, and his successful track record comprised investments in 29 portfolio companies, including four that completed an IPO. He started his career as an investment banker with the Corporate Finance department of Smith Barney.

Professor Sutter graduated from Yale University with a B.A. degree in Economics and received his M.B.A. from Stanford University. His interests include scuba diving, military history, and blues guitar.

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Full-Time / Part-Time MBA
NUvention: Medical Innovation I (formerly BIOT-915-0) (HEMA-915-0)

This course counts toward the following majors: Biotechnology Management, Health Enterprise Management, Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Medical Innovation is a two-quarter sequence focused on the creation of innovations for the health industry. Students, guided by faculty and physicians from Kellogg and the Northwestern law, medical and engineering schools work in teams to develop medical products. Students experience the entire innovation life cycle from ideation to prototyping, legal protection, market sizing and business plan development. At the end of the course, the teams present their business plans to a panel of venture capitalists with the goal of securing funding and possible formation of a start-up. Key deliverables in this class include: “elevator pitch” to request prototype/pilot funding, prototype development, provisional patent application, FDA 510/K application and business plan presentation to venture capitalists. To enroll in this course, permission from the instructor is required before registration. Students must take both the fall (I) and winter (II) quarter courses, in sequence, and will earn 2.0 credits after successfully completing both courses.

NUvention: Medical Innovation II (formerly BIOT-916-0) (HEMA-916-0)

This course counts toward the following majors: Biotechnology Management, Health Enterprise Management, Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Medical Innovation is a two-quarter sequence focused on the creation of innovations for the health industry. Students, guided by faculty and physicians from Kellogg and the Northwestern law, medical and engineering schools work in teams to develop medical products. Students experience the entire innovation life cycle from ideation to prototyping, legal protection, market sizing and business plan development. At the end of the course, the teams present their business plans to a panel of venture capitalists with the goal of securing funding and possible formation of a start-up. Key deliverables in this class include: “elevator pitch” to request prototype/pilot funding, prototype development, provisional patent application, FDA 510/K application and business plan presentation to venture capitalists. To enroll in this course, permission from the instructor is required before registration. Students must take both the fall and winter quarter courses, in sequence, and will earn 2.0 credits after successfully completing both courses. Note: This course may not be dropped after the first week of the quarter.

Venture Capital and Private Equity: The Human Element (KIEI-926-0)

This course counts toward the following majors: Entrepreneurship & Innovation

Formerly ENTR-926-0

This advanced course in private equity focuses on the many interpersonal issues facing the professional investor. Individual psychology and group behavior play a critical role in determining the ultimate success or failure of an investment, yet the human element is often mismanaged or overlooked in favor of financial analysis and market studies. A major portion of this course covers the relationship between the investor and the entrepreneur after the initial financing - motivation and compensation, the role of the board of directors, performance evaluation and accountability. Additional topics include fund-raising, deal negotiation and due diligence investigation. This course is designed for students who are seriously considering a career in the private equity business or who desire a deeper understanding of the investor/entrepreneur relationship. The course builds on the fundamental skills of deal analysis, valuation and negotiation, which are taught with a quantitative emphasis in other private equity or venture capital courses offered at the Kellogg School.

Global Governance of Private Companies (KIEI-965-0)

Formerly ENTR-965-0

Governance issues must be addressed by the power centers of all organizations, ranging from startups to mid-market and other non-public companies. Almost all Kellogg graduates will serve as an officer and director of one of these U.S. or foreign organizations during their career.

The aim of this interdisciplinary course is to equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to handle controversial governance issues which often fall in the intersection of business, law and ethics. Concepts will cover private equity, professional service, and closely held firms, as well as the more stringent laws that exist in other countries. We will debate current issues and proposed regulations that affect directors in the U.S. and internationally to help executives do the right thing and avoid liabilities. Guests will include the heads of private equity, consulting and investment banking firms.