Rachel Ruttan
Rachel Ruttan

MANAGEMENT & ORGANIZATIONS
Lecturer of Management & Organizations

Print Overview

Rachel Ruttan is a doctoral candidate at Kellogg School of Management. Her research examines how people navigate tensions between actions that benefit self-interest versus prosocial goals and values. Her work has been published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, and the Academy of Management Proceedings, and has been featured in Harvard Business Review, The New York Times, and NPR.



Print Vita
Education
B.AH., 2009, Psychology, Queen's University, Summa Cum Laude
M.S., 2011, Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University
Ph.D, 2017, Management and Organizations, Northwestern University

Academic Positions
Section Instructor, Cornell University-2010
Teaching Assistant, Management and Organizations, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 2012-2015
Teaching Assistant, Management and Organizations, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University-2016
Teaching Assistant, Management and Organizations, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 2014-2016

Honors and Awards
Ann Adamson Award in Psychology, Queen's University
Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship
Medal in Psychology, Queens University
Dispute Resolution Research Center Research Grant
Grant, Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, 2011-2014
Best Reviewer Award, Academy of Management OB Division
Interdisciplinary Research Award, Management and Organizations, Kellogg School of Management
Best Reviewer Award, Academy of Management OB Division
Academy of Management Best Paper Proccedings

Print Research
Research Interests

Emotion, Compassion and Prosocial Behavior, Values and Moral Judgment, Motivation



Articles
Ruttan, Rachel and Loran Nordgren. 2015. Perceptions of Desire: A Hot-Cold Empathy Perspective. The Psychology of Desire.
Ruttan, Rachel and Loran Nordgren. 2016. The Strength to Face the Facts: Self-regulation Defends Against Defensive Information Processing. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

 
Print Teaching
Full-Time / Evening & Weekend MBA
Negotiations Fundamentals (MORS-472-5)
This course is designed to provide the fundamentals of negotiation strategy and to improve students' skills in all phases of negotiation. The course provides an understanding of prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to two party negotiations, team negotiations, resolution of disputes, agents and ethics, and management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts. Attendance at every class meeting is mandatory.