Martin Lariviere
Martin Lariviere

MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS & DECISION SCIENCES; OPERATIONS
John L. and Helen Kellogg Professor of Managerial Economics & Decision Sciences
Chair of Managerial Economics & Decision Sciences Department

Print Overview

Professor Martin A. Lariviere joined the faculty at the Kellogg School of Management in 2000. Professor Lariviere’s research has focused on applying economic analysis to operations management problems. Much of his work has focused on supply chain contracting, examining how contract terms can improve supply chain performance. He has also studied how the behavior of self-interested customers impacts service operations.

His research has appeared in leading academic journals such as Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, Management Science, Operations Research, and Marketing Science. He has also written articles for Harvard Business Review and Sloan Management Review. He has been a member of the editorial boards of Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, Management Science, and Operations Research.

He received his PhD from Stanford University. Prior to joining Kellogg, he was an Associate Professor at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business.



Areas of Expertise
Service Management
Supply Chain Design and Management
Print Vita
Education
PhD, 1995, Business, Stanford University
BA, 1988, Economics, Yale University, Distinction in the major, Magna Cum Laude

Academic Positions
Professor, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 2007-present
Professor (by courtesy), Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, Northwestern University, 2007-present
Director, Center for Operations and Supply Chain Management, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 2004-present
Associate Professor of Managerial Economics and Decision Sciences, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 2000-2007
Associate Professor of Operations Managerment, Fuqua School of Business, Duke University, 1999-2000
Assistant Professor of Operations Management, Fuqua School of Business, Duke University, 1995-1999
Research Associate, Charles River Associates, 1988-1989

Editorial Positions
Editorial Board, IIE Transactions, 2001-Present
Department Editor, Management Science, 2009-present
Senior Editor, Productions and Operations Management, 2007-present
Associate Editor, Manufacturing and Service Operations Management, 2003-2008
Associate Editor, Management Science, 2000-2006
Associate Editor, Operations Research, 2000-2005
Department Editor, Management Science, 2009

Service
Manufacturing and Service Operations Management Society, President
6/15/2007 - 6/14/2008

 
Print Research
Research Interests
Service management, supply chain management, supply chain contracting and incentives

Articles
Cil, Eren and Martin Lariviere. 2013. Saving Seats for Strategic Customers. Operations Research. 61(6): 1321-1332.
Alexandrov, Alexei and Martin Lariviere. 2012. Are Reservations Recommended?. Manufacturing & Service Operations Management. 14(2): 218-230.
Lariviere, Martin and Lauren Xiaoyuan Lu. 2012. Capacity Allocation over a Long Horizon: The Return on Turn-and-Earn. Manufacturing & Service Operations Management. 14(1): 24-41.
Akan, Mustafa, Baris Ata and Martin Lariviere. 2011. Asymmetric Information and Economies-of-Scale in Service Contracting. Manufacturing and Service Operations Management. 13(1): 58-72.
Lariviere, Martin. 2006. A Note on Probability Distributions with Increasing Generalized Failure Rates. Operations Research. 54(3): 602-604.
Chopra, Sunil and Martin Lariviere. 2005. Managing Service Inventory to Improve Performance. MIT Sloan Management Review. 47(1): 56-63.
Lariviere, Martin and Gérard Cachon. 2005. Supply Chain Coordination with Revenue-Sharing Contracts: Strengths and Limitations. Management Science. 51(1): 8-14.
Lariviere, Martin and Jan A. Van Mieghem. 2004. Strategically Seeking Service: How Competition Can Generate Poisson Arrivals. Manufacturing & Service Operations Management. 6(1): 23-40.
Lariviere, Martin and Gérard Cachon. 2001. Contracting to Assure Supply: How to Share Demand Forecasts in a Supply Chain. Management Science. 47(5): 629-646.
Lariviere, Martin and Gérard Cachon. 2001. Turning the Supply Chain into a Revenue Chain. Harvard Business Review. 79(3): 20-21.
Lariviere, Martin and Evan L. Porteus. 2001. Selling to the Newsvendor: An Analysis of Price-Only Contracts. Manufacturing & Service Operations Management. 3(4): 293-305.
Kouvelis, Panagiotis and Martin Lariviere. 2000. Decentralizing Cross-Functional Decisions: Coordination Through Internal Markets. Management Science. 46(8): 1049-1058.
Lariviere, Martin and Gérard Cachon. 1999. An Equilibrium Analysis of Linear, Proportional and Uniform Allocation of Scarce Capacity. IIE Transactions. 31(9): 835-849.
Lariviere, Martin and Evan L. Porteus. 1999. Stalking Information: Bayesian Inventory Management with Unobserved Lost Sales. Management Science. 45(3): 346-363.
Lariviere, Martin and Gérard Cachon. 1999. Capacity Allocation Using Past Sales: When to Turn-and-Earn. Management Science. 45(5): 685-703.
Lariviere, Martin and Gérard Cachon. 1999. Capacity Choice and Allocation: Strategic Behavior and Supply Chain Performance. Management Science. 45(8): 685-703.
Lariviere, Martin and V. Padmanabhan. 1997. Slotting Allowances and New Product Introductions. Marketing Science. 16(2): 112-128.
Working Papers
Gurvich, ItaiMartin Lariviere and Antonio Moreno-Garcia. 2013. Staffing Service Systems when Capacity Has a Mind of its Own.
Allon, GadAchal Bassamboo and Martin Lariviere. 2013. Will the Social Planner Let Bags Fly Free?.
Lariviere, Martin, Michaela Hoehn and Arnd Huchzermeier. 2009. Relational Supply Contracts: Voluntary Concessions in Return Policies for Continuous Quality Improvements.
Lariviere, Martin. 2002. Inducing Forecast Revelation Through Restricted Returns.
Lariviere, Martin and Evan L. Porteus. 1995. Manufacturer-Retailer Contracting under an Unknown Demand Distribution.
Book Chapters
Lariviere, Martin. "Capacity Allocation." In Wiley Encyclopedia of Operations Research and Management Science, edited by James Cochran, Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.
Lariviere, Martin. 1999. "Supply Chain Contracting and Coordination with Stochastic Demand." In Quantitative Models for Supply Chain Management, edited by S. Tayur, M. Magazine, and R. Ganeshan, 233-268. Boston, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Cases
Lariviere, Martin. 2007. The BAT Case: Putting Tech Support on the Fast Track. Case 5-207-250 (KEL272).

 
Print Teaching
Teaching Interests
Operations management, service operations, operations economics
Full-Time / Part-Time MBA
Operations Management (OPNS-430-0)

This course counts toward the following majors:Operations.

Operations management is the management of business processes--that is, the management of the recurring activities of a firm. This course aims to familiarize students with the problems and issues confronting operations managers, and to provide the language, concepts, insights and tools to deal with these issues to gain competitive advantage through operations. We examine how different business strategies require different business processes and how different operational capabilities allow and support different strategies to gain competitive advantage. A process view of operations is used to analyze different key operational dimensions such as capacity management, cycle time management, supply chain and logistics management, and quality management. Finally, we connect to recent developments such as lean or world-class manufacturing, just-in-time operations, time-based competition and business re-engineering.

Service Operations (OPNS-482-0)

This course counts toward the following majors: Operations, Health Enterprise Management, Managerial Analytics

Services are playing an ever-increasing role in the American and world economies. Consequently, it is important for a manager to understand how services differ from manufacturing operations and how traditional operations' management techniques can be applied to services. (For example, how do insights from lean operations apply to service settings?) This course applies concepts from the core operations class, extending the discussion of managing variability and customer waits. The impact of priorities, pricing and employee staffing are considered in this setting. Additional topics include evaluation of service productivity, management of service quality and recovery, the impact of human resource policies and techniques for revenue management. The course examines service operations in healthcare, retail environments and airlines, among other settings.

Executive MBA
Operations Management (OPNSX-430-0)
Operations Management examines the basic principles of managing the production and distribution of goods and services. The course approaches operations as a managerial integration function and provides frameworks and tools to target and implement improvements in business processes.