Finance Department

  • Ravi Jagannathan
    Ravi Jagannathan
    Chicago Mercantile Exchange/John F. Sandner Professor of Finance Ravi Jagannathan Photo © Nathan Mandell

The Kellogg School's Finance department is renowned in a broad range of specialties, from technical asset pricing to corporate financial policies and capital market dynamics. Faculty research is consistently recognized by award-winning publications in flagship finance journals. The Finance faculty also serve as editors of leading professional publications, setting the standards for new ideas in finance. The Finance major, among the most popular at the Kellogg School, takes full advantage of this expertise in a broad set of courses taught by faculty at the forefront of the field. more...

Kellogg Insight presents articles on Finance

Red Ink, Red-Eyed Judges, and the High Costs of Crowded Bankruptcy Courts
The timing of a bankruptcy filing shapes the verdict and has consequences for all of us
Based on the research of Benjamin Iverson
The timing of a bankruptcy filing shapes the verdict and has consequences for all of us: During economic downturns, when bankruptcy judges have especially high caseloads, firms’ reorganization plans are approved at higher rates than when judges have lighter caseloads. That can be good news for a firm hoping to reorganize during a recession, since having its plan approved means that it will stay in business and its debt load will be reduced. But there are trade-offs.

Want to Work in Science? Men Have the Advantage
How gender discrimination affects hiring
Based on the research of Ernesto Reuben , Paola Sapienza And Luigi Zingales
How gender discrimination affects hiring: New research by Paola Sapienza suggests that women are initially assumed to be less competent at basic mathematical tasks than men even when they are not—and that when asked, women, unlike men, tend to understate their abilities.

Do Former Soldiers Make Better CEOs?
Chief executives with military experience perform better under pressure and are much less likely to commit corporate fraud
Based on the research of Efraim Benmelech And Carola Frydman
Chief executives with military experience perform better under pressure and are much less likely to commit corporate fraud : The authors analyze the impact of military service among CEOs of large US firms between 1980 and 2006 on corporate outcomes. They find that a history of military service is associated with CEO behavior that is more financially conservative, more ethical, and more adept at leading firms through periods of distress.

Finance Department News

  • Greening brownfields
    Morgan Stanley Sustainable Investing Challenge winners

    Kellogg Part-Time students win Morgan Stanley Sustainable Investing Challenge with environmental plan

  • Kellogg's 'Midas' touch
    Forbes logo

    Three Kellogg alumni have been named to Forbes' yearly list of the 100 top tech investors

  • Winning spirit
    Wharton Case Competition winners

    Kellogg students top buyout case competition

  • Value valued
    Ravi Jagannathan

    Kellogg’s Ravi Jagannathan to be honored for contributions to value investing

  • Investing in people
    Dimitris Papanikolaou

    Kellogg professor wins top award for paper on the profit of talent

Upcoming Events

  • Simon Lee

    Workshop in Econometrics

    Apr 15, 2014, 3:30 PM

  • Gary Gorton

    Finance Seminar Series

    Apr 16, 2014, 11:30 AM

  • Sasha Indarte

    Macroeconomics Lunch Seminar

    Apr 16, 2014, 12:00 PM

  • Lorenz Kueng

    Finance Bag Lunch Series

    Apr 17, 2014, 12:15 PM

  • Pablo Kurlat

    Finance Seminar Series

    Apr 23, 2014, 11:30 AM