Management & Organizations Department

  • Leigh Thompson
    J. Jay Gerber Professor of Dispute Resolution & Organizations Leigh Thompson Photo © Nathan Mandell

We are leaders in teaching essential management skills and developing new, scientifically rigorous knowledge about management practice.

Our website is designed to give convenient access to information about all our teaching and research activities.

MBA students can learn more about the general purpose of our courses by reading our mission statement. Who else is better qualified to judge the value of our courses than generations of MBA alumni? Read the testimonials of three distinguished Kellogg alumni who have found our courses particularly valuable during all stages of their careers.

On our website, students can also read the description of our courses and the requirements for our two majors (Management & Organizations, Human Resource Management) and three minors (Management Consulting, Leadership, Decision Making & Negotiation).

Our doctoral program page gives prospective Ph.D. students a detailed description of the nature of our doctoral education. It also lists all of our current doctoral students and our Ph.D. alumni. Because our faculty is very active in executive education, we provide potential participants an overview of all the executive education programs the Management & Organizations faculty is involved in teaching.

Our faculty is known around the world for path-breaking research. The FacultyResearch sections provide links to individual faculty pages, research centers, labs affiliated with the department and faculty publications. Information about our conferences and seminars are available on the Events page.

Enjoy our website and please contact us if you have any further questions.

Kellogg Insight presents articles on Management & Organizations Department

Are Bean Counters More Selfish?
Emphasizing a “calculative mindset” encourages people to act more selfishly and less ethically when making decisions.
Based on the research of Long Wang , Chen-Bo Zhong And J. Keith Murnighan
Emphasizing a “calculative mindset” encourages people to act more selfishly and less ethically when making decisions.: Emphasizing a “calculative mindset” encourages people to act more selfishly and less ethically when making decisions. Taking a solely quantitative approach to solving problems inhibits an individual’s ethical awareness by de-emphasizing social factors that would normally motivate people to avoid appearing greedy or dishonest. Reactivating this ethical awareness with social cues such as stories and images about real people seems to offset the negative consequences of restricted, calculative reasoning.

Calling a Strike a Strike
In Major League Baseball, a pitcher’s star status leads to favorable calls
Based on the research of Jerry Kim And Brayden King
In Major League Baseball, a pitcher’s star status leads to favorable calls: New research finds that higher-status pitchers receive more favorable calls on similar pitches than lower-status pitchers. The "All-Star" effect is larger when calls are more difficult to make. Results are interpreted in terms of the "Matthew Effect," the broader phenomenon of the rich getting richer while the poor get poorer.

Leaders Do Matter—But When Does Their Gender Matter, Too?
Countries with high levels of ethnic diversity often suffer from slow economic growth—unless there is a woman in charge
Based on the research of Susan E. Perkins , Katherine W. Phillips And Nicholas Pearce
Countries with high levels of ethnic diversity often suffer from slow economic growth—unless there is a woman in charge: Might female leaders—“who tend to have a more participative, collaborative style than men,” says Nicholas Pearce—be well-equipped to counteract, or even overturn, the negative association between diversity and economic growth? A provocative new study by Susan Perkins and Pearce suggests that the answer may be yes. The authors replicate previous findings that high levels of ethnic fractionalization (EF) are associated with slower growth of gross domestic product (GDP). But they also show that in countries with a high EF, those with female leaders suffer less from this negative association.

Management & Organizations Department News